Thou didst leave Thy throne and Thy kingly crown

1
Thou didst leave Thy throne and Thy kingly crown,
  When Thou camest to earth for me;
But in Bethlehem’s home was there found no room
  For Thy holy nativity:
  Oh, come to my heart, Lord Jesus!
There is room in my heart for Thee;
Oh, come to my heart, Lord Jesus, come,
  There is room in my heart for Thee.
2
Heaven’s arches rang when the angels sang,
  Proclaiming Thy royal degree;
But of lowly birth cam’st Thou, Lord, on earth,
  And in great humility:
3
The foxes found rest, and the birds had their nest
  In the shade of the forest tree;
But Thy couch was the sod, O Thou Son of God,
  In the deserts of Galilee:
4
Thou camest, O Lord, with the living Word
  That should set Thy people free;
But with mocking scorn, and with crown of thorn,
  They bore Thee to Calvary:
  Oh, come to my heart, Lord Jesus!
Thy cross is my only plea;
Oh, come to my heart, Lord Jesus, come,
Thy cross is my only plea.
5
When heaven’s arches shall ring, and her choirsshall sing
  At Thy coming to victory,
Let Thy voice call me up, saying, “Yet there is room,
  There is room at My side for thee!”
  And my heart shall rejoice, Lord Jesus!
When Thou comest and callest for me;
And my heart shall rejoice, Lord Jesus!
  When Thou comest and callest for me.
7
Ana Lara

United States

Emily Eliott was born in Brighton, England, on July 22, 1836. Throughout her life she was associated with the evangelical faction of the Anglican Church. She worked tirelessly with the rescue missions and Sunday Schools in her area. Emily was the nice of Charlotte Eliott, author of the hymn “Just as I Am”. For six years she was the editor of “The Church Missionary Juvenile Instructor” magazine. Forty-eight of her hymns were published in a book called “Under the Pillow”, a book used especially for patients in hospitals, infirmaries or at home.

The text was printed by Miss Eliott privately for the choir and for the school children of St. Mark’s at Brighton, England where her father ministered. She wanted to teach children about the Lord Jesus’ incarnation, human living, crucifixion and second coming. The text for this hymn was based on the verse from Luke 2:7 “but there was no room for them in the inn. ”

In the four verses of the hymn, Miss Eliott is able to achieve a stark paradox in each of the stanzas separated by the word “but”:

Stanza One... Heaven’s throne and crown-but no room in Bethlehem.

Stanza Two... Heaven’s royal degree-but earth’s great humiliation.

Stanza Three... Earth’s creatures have their homes-but for Him the desert.

Stanza four... He came bringing redemption-but men gave Him Calvary.

Stanza Five... there is no contrast here, it speaks only of Christ’s victory in His second coming: When heaven’s arches shall ring and the choirs shall sing at Thy coming to victory.

The tune “Margaret” was composed especially for this text by Timothy Richard Matthews. Matthews was born at Bedford, England, on November 4th, 1826 and was recognized in Great Britain as one of the leading organists of his day. He was also a clergyman and the composer of more than 100 hymn tunes.


Martha Aurora

Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico

As I thought of the Father giving the Son, and the Son giving His life and the Holy Spirit willing to come and live in temples of clay I began to sing this hymn. “Such a wonderful salvation ever can a mortal know” praise His name!!


Denny

Bluffton, Ohio, United States

Just read Revelation 5:9 and the lyrics to this hymn popped into my head. The Lamb gave up His life to purchase “Men from Every Tribe and Nation “. “Every knee shall bow and Every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord “. Amen!


Sal Tarun

Alfred, New York, United States

Oh, this hymn resonated with me deeply this morning... Indeed, our heart was made for Christ to dwell in as His home (Ephesians 3:16-17). Come, LORD Jesus and dwell!


Glen V

San Jose, CA, United States

There is always more room in our hearts! O’ Lord Jesus! Special thanks to Alan for sharing this song with us tonight in fellowship.


Steve Miller

Detroit, Mi, United States

Emily Elliott had a special concern for those who were sick. She wrote many poems and hymn texts especially for the infirm, publishing 48 of them in a little book called "Under the Pillow". She may have been influenced by her aunt, Charlotte Elliott, who wrote "Just as I am". Charlotte was also a prolific poet and was sickly for much of her life.

This particular hymn was written for children, to teach them about Jesus' birth. It has a simple construction - each of the 1st 4 stanzas presents a contrast with the word "but". The chorus is a natural response to the predicament, something that even a child could understand.

The last stanza provides a stirring conclusion. The Lord, once rejected and displaced, will soon come in victory - and we should all be waiting. - Great Songs of Faith by Brown & Norton


Worring

Ooty, Tamil Nadu, India

Wonderful!!! Lord, come and live in my heart forever.