Christ is risen! Hallelujah

1
Christ is risen! Hallelujah!
Risen our victorious Head;
Sing His praises; Hallelujah!
Christ is risen from the dead.
Gratefully our hearts adore Him,
As His light once more appears;
Bowing down in joy before Him,
Rising up from griefs and tears.
  Christ is risen: Hallelujah!
Risen our victorious Head;
Sing His praises; Hallelujah!
  Christ is risen from the dead.
2
Christ is risen! All the sadness
Of His earthly life is o’er;
Through the open gates of gladness
He returns to life once more;
Death and hell before Him bending,
He doth rise the Victor now,
Angels on His steps attending,
Glory round His wounded brow.
3
Christ is risen! Henceforth never
Death nor hell shall us enthrall;
We are Christ’s, in Him forever
We have triumphed over all;
All the doubting and dejection
Of our trembling hearts have ceased,
’Tis His day of resurrection;
Let us rise and keep the feast.
1
Steve Miller

Detroit, MI, United States

Monsell, son of the arch­dea­con of Lon­don­der­ry, Ire­land, at­tend­ed Trin­i­ty Coll­ege in Dub­lin, and was or­dained in 1834. His eldest son Thomas died on the way to the Crimean War in 1855, aged 18, in a shipwreck off Italy; his eldest daughter Elizabeth Isabella died in England at the age of 28 in 1861. Another daughter, Jane Diana, married Rev. C.W. Furse in 1859.

His brother Charles, also a clergyman, married Harriet O'Brien, who, after her husband's death in Italy, refounded the Community of St John Baptist to help single mothers . Through Charles and Harriet, John Monsell became influenced by the Oxford Movement and also became acquainted with William Ewart Gladstone, Prime Minister of England, with whom he maintained a correspondence. He was responsible for the building or rebuilding of three church buildings were he served. While inspecting the rebuilding of the last, Monsell fell from a boulder, and subsequently died from an infected wound.

He was a strong advocate of vigorous congregational singing. He felt that hymn singing should be more fervent and joyous. His 11 vol­umes of po­e­try en­com­pass al­most 300 hymns. - Wikipedia & Songs of the Spirit by Martin

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Following stanza 2, there is an additional stanza which is usually omitted. (I think way the last line is written is a problem due to the dual meaning of "lost". It would be better to say "gone" instead of "lost".)

2b Christ is risen! all the sorrow

That last evening round Him lay,

Now has found a glorious morrow

In the rising of today;

And the grave its first-fruits giveth,

Spring up from holy ground,

He was dead, now He liveth,

He was lost, but He is found.