A mighty Fortress is our God

1
A mighty Fortress is our God,
A Bulwark never failing;
Our Helper He amid the flood
Of mortal ills prevailing:
For still our ancient foe
Doth seek to work us woe;
His craft and power are great,
And, armed with cruel hate,
On earth is not his equal.
2
Did we in our own strength confide,
Our striving would be losing;
Were not the right Man on our side,
The Man of God’s own choosing:
Dost ask who that may be?
Christ Jesus, it is He;
Lord Sabaoth His Name,
From age to age the same,
And He must win the battle.
3
And though this world, with devils filled,
Should threaten to undo us,
We will not fear, for God hath willed
His truth to triumph through us:
The Prince of Darkness grim,
We tremble not for him;
His rage we can endure,
For lo! his doom is sure,
One little word shall fell him.
4
That word above all earthly powers,
No thanks to them, abideth;
The Spirit and the gifts are ours
Through Him who with us sideth:
Let goods and kindred go,
This mortal life also;
The body they may kill:
God’s truth abideth still,
His Kingdom is forever.
116
Angie Jackson

Clark County, Ohio, United States

Such an incredible devotion to God. A wise man once said, "Blessed are the poor in Spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom."


Samantha Miller

Newcastle, County Down, United Kingdom

This is nearly the end of the age the words of this hymn remind us that God alone is our fortress in whom we must trust to keep us safe and take us safe to our home in heaven.

It is the Lord Jesus Christ who saves us by His blood. Put your trust in Him people before it is too late and the night comes and none can be saved. tell your family and friends to trust Today .!!


Ntando Gxuluwe

Johnstown, PA, United States

I have been 📚 Psalm 46 and most commentaries made reference to Luther. It took me back to the 911 situation in the US. I heard the Presbyterian ⛪ refer to Luther. Here we are in 2020 devastated by Covid19. The words came to mind for courage to the 🌎.


Michelle B McPherson

Gainesville, VA, United States

To Carol Gosselink: Amen, dear sister!


Carol Gosselink

Des Moines, IA, United States

If you sing it out loud majestically with pomp and circumstance it gives you more than a minute of handwashing time. You can sing half of it for the first time you wash your hands thoroughly and then the second half of the first verse for the next handwashing. It is truly applicable to our current coronavirus plague.


Iliromah Ufoma

A great hymn with a great timeless message for Christian faithfuls


Jalin Camper

Florida, Congo

It's a good song I know that song they sing it at my church! (:


Cathleen

Madang, Papua New Guinea

I love this hymn so much. Whenever I'm faced with temptations, or when I am feeling down or hurt, I used to sing it. And when I do, I regain strength and find peace again, all because God is my Mighty Fortress. Such a beautiful hymn. It also makes me grow deeper and deeper in love with my LORD. AMEN!


Ana Lara

United States

Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483 in Eisleben, Saxony, Germany. He was educated at the University of Erfurt, later becoming an Augustinian monk, teaching philosophy and theology at the University of Wittenberg, Germany. On Oct. 31, 1517, (sometimes called the 4th of July of Protestantism), Martin nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Cathedral of Wittenberg Germany condemning the various practices and teachings of the Catholic Church. After several years of stormy disputes with the Pope and church leaders, Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church in 1520.

One of the important benefits of the Reformation Movement was the rediscovery of congregational singing. Luther had strong convictions about the use and power of sacred music. He expressed his convictions in this way, “ If any man despises music, as all fanatics do, for him I have no liking; for music is a gift and grace of God, not an invention of men”. In another place he said, “I wish to compose sacred hymns so that the Word of God may dwell among the people also by means of songs. ” Finally Luther wrote, “I would allow no man to preach or teach God’s people without the proper knowledge of the use and power of sacred song. ”

The single most powerful hymn of the Protestant Reformation Movement was Luther’s ‘A Mighty Fortress is Our God, ’ based on Psalm 46 “ The Lord is my rock and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower. ”

This hymn became the battle cry of the people, a great source of strength and inspiration even for those who were martyred for their faith. This hymn has been translated into practically every known language and is regarded as one of the noblest and most classic examples of Christian hymnody. It is said that there are around 60 translations of this text in English alone. In England the version by Thomas Carlyle is in general use, while in the United States the translation by Frederick H. Hedge, a professor of Harvard University is used most frequently. This translation was made in 1852 and first appeared in a book entitled ‘Gems of German Verse’ by W. H. Furness published in 1853.

The first line of this national hymn of Protestant Germany was fittingly inscribed on the tomb of the great reformer at Wittenberg, and may still be read with appreciation by those who travel to that historical spot.


Nicholas Silwamba

Lusaka, Zambia

So glorious hymn of ages by Martine Ruther, declaring that power and authority of Jesus Christ given to us as a church today! To God be all the glory and honour!

It's so real to me, very inspirational hymn which never loose it's meaning in all ages to come!