How firm a foundation (Alternate Tune)

1
How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord,
Is laid for your faith in His excellent word!
What more can He say than to you He hath said,
To you who for refuge to Jesus have fled?
2
“Fear not, I am with thee, O be not dismayed,
For I am thy God, and will still give thee aid;
I’ll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand,
Upheld by My righteous, omnipotent hand.”
3
“When through the deep waters I call thee to go,
The rivers of sorrow shall not overflow;
For I will be with thee, thy troubles to bless,
And sanctify to thee thy deepest distress.”
4
“When through fiery trials thy pathway shall lie,
My grace, all sufficient, shall be thy supply;
The flame shall not hurt thee; I only design
Thy dross to consume, and thy gold to refine.”
5
“E’en down to old age all My people shall prove
My sovereign, eternal, unchangeable love;
And then, when grey hairs shall their temples adorn,
Like lambs they shall still in My bosom be borne.”
6
“The soul that on Jesus hath leaned for repose,
I will not, I will not desert to his foes;
That soul, though all hell should endeavor to shake,
I’ll never, no, never, no, never forsake!”
5
Franklyn

Daresalaam

I just figured out all the three stages of the believer's life in this hymn reference to our salvation—Justification, Sanctification, and Glorification

The writer presents clearly:

1. The assurance of our standing—on the only reliable/ dependable foundation.

2. The assurance of our progress in our walk as we go through life.

3. The assurance of us going right through to glory.

What blessed assurance "He is able to keep you [all believers] from falling and to present you [all believers] faultless before the presence of His glory with exceeding joy"- Jude 24


Steve Miller

Detroit, MI, United States

Most hymnals simply list the author of this hymn as "K" because he wanted to remain anonymous. The hymn was 1st published in 1787 in a hymnbook put together by John Rippon, a Baptist minister in London. While the author remained a mystery for a while, most musicologists now agree that John Rippon's assistant, Robert Keene, was probably the author.

The title of the hymn was "Scripture Promises," and in that 1787 hymnbook these words from 2 Peter 1:4 were printed above the 1st stanza: "Great and precious promises." Each stanza of the hymn emphasizes a different promise in God's Word, with the great climax coming on the last verse, "The soul that on Jesus still leans for repose ... I'll never, no, never, no, never forsake.!" - Great Songs of Faith by Brown & Norton


Edwin Miller III

Coldwater, Michigan, United States

I love this tune. I have written my own lyrics to this tune. Here is the first verse:

Great grace of our Lord, so sublime and so great;

There is no other love that can ever equate.

Though others may leave us, our lovers, our friends;

Thy love, O thy love Lord, thy love never ends.


Betty Jane Bonn

Dunlap, Illinois, United States

Thank God that eternal salvation is not about works; it is all about abiding in the Vine, Jesus Christ.

John15:1 and 6a

I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman...If a man abide not in me, he is cast forth as a branch, and is withered...


Ebenezer

Hyderabad, India

It speaks about the assurance of salvation. Many think that salvation of a believer will be lost. I don't know how it can be lost when salvation is God's work, and how can man sustain it by his own works and not by God's grace!!