How sweet, how heav’nly is the sight

1
How sweet, how heav’nly is the sight,
  When those who love the Lord
In one another’s peace delight,
  And so fulfill His Word:
2
When each can feel his brother’s sigh,
  And with him bear a part;
When sorrow flows from eye to eye,
  And joy from heart to heart;
3
When, free from envy, scorn and pride,
  Our wishes all above,
Each can his brother’s failings hide,
  And show a brother’s love;
4
When love, in one delightful stream,
  Through every bosom flows;
When union sweet, and dear esteem,
  In every action glows.
5
Love is the golden chain that binds;
  The saints Thy grace thus prove.
And he is glory’s heir that finds
  His bosom glow with love.
2
Ana Lara

Storrs, Connecticut, United States

Joseph Swain was born in Birmingham, England in 1761. He was apprentice at a young age to the engravers trade, but he was a boy of poetic temperament and fond of writing verses. After his spiritual conversion which brought new purpose into his life, he was baptized by Dr. Rippon and studied for the ministry. At the age of 25, he served at the Baptist Church in Walworth, where he remained until his death, April 16, 1796.

For over two centuries his hymns have lived and been loved in all the English-speaking world. Among those still in use are:

How sweet, how heavenly is the sight,

Pilgrims we are to Canaan bound,

O Thou in whose presence my soul takes delight.

He wrote a hymn “Brethren, while we sojourn here. ” It was used in the cottage meetings as well as in the larger Greenwood assemblies. It was written by Reverend Swain about 1783.

Brethren, while we sojourn here

Fight we must, but should not fear.

Foes we have, but we’ve a Friend,

One who loves us to the end;

Forward then with courage go;

Long we shall not dwell below,

Soon the joyful news will come,

“Child, your Father calls, ‘Come home. ’”

(Brown and Butterworth)


Steve Miller

Livonia, MI, United States

The song lyrics are tops, and the tune is good, but the "new tune" is outstanding.